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Naval Aviation. II

The Breguet 521 Bizerte

Catalogue number 128014

Breguet 521 Bizerte


This Bizerte (named La Recherche) has cowled engines, one of several modifications to the prototype which included installing blister gun positions in the fuselage and the elimination of the bow gun. Given its role in maritime reconnaissance, the cockpit was extended forward to the bow to improve observation. The port engine has been removed as well as the three propellers.

Verso:"Twin (sic) motor biplane '< 39" in French and in light pencil


8.7cm x 5.7cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 107091

Breguet Bizerte, rear gun position


We have a good view of the rear gun position in this photograph, with its canopy to give the gunner some protection from the slipstream. Note the wide span of the upper wing, 35.18m. Photographed at Saint Raphael.

Verso: Postcard franked May 1946


13.2cm x 8.3cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 105045 detail

Three Bizerte moored


A group of three Bizerte flying boats moored off the coast.




14.5cm x 8.9cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 106076

Short Calcutta


The Breguet 521 Bizerte was based on the British Short Calcutta. Here we can see the Short Calcutta G-AATZ belonging to Imperial Airways. Note the open cockpit with pilot and co-pilot side by side. The upper wingspan (28.35 m) was considerably less than that of the Bizerte.




13.2cm x 7.6cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 106075

French evaluation of the Short Calcutta


Breguet Aviation bought a Short Calcutta in 1929 for evaluation as a long-range sea reconnaissance flying boat, shown here is F-AJDR. After Breguet purchased a manufacturing licence in 1931, an initial batch of three was ordered in 1934 and several small production orders followed up to 1940.




13.2cm x 7.6cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 113075

The Short Rangoon, true precurser of the Bizerte


The Short Calcutta was destined to be a civil aircraft to work the routes to distant parts of the British Empire. After the purchase of a single Short Calcutta and acquiring a manufacture licence, Breguet modified the design for a naval reconnaissance role as Short had done with their navalised Calcutta which became the Short Rangoon.

Verso:"Short Rangoon 1930 Powered by three 450 hp Bristol Jupiter VIs. A military version of the successful Calcutta, this aircraft was in service with the RAF."

Credit: Short Brothers & Harland Ltd.


20.5cm x 15.6cm Gelatin silver print

 
Catalogue number 31006

Short Rangoon S1433 flying during trials at Rochester


The Rangoon was navalised by giving it an enclosed cockpit, enlarged fuel tanks, a bow Lewis gun and port/starboard stepped Lewis guns in the rear fuselage plus bomb racks. Here we can see the two of the three gun positions. S1433 was the first Rangoon launched and flown in 1930.

Verso:""Short Rangoon 1930 Powered by three 450 hp Bristol Jupiter VIs. A military version of the successful Calcutta, this aircraft was in service with the RAF."

Credit: Short Brothers & Harland Ltd.


24.3cm x 19.4cm Gelatin silver print

 

Some Floatplanes from the Interwar years

Catalogue number 130042

Fairey Flycatcher, B turret H.M.S. Ramillies


This fine photograph shows a Fairey Flycatcher shipped by H.M.S. Ramillies (seriel numbers N9913 3.26-4.26; S1070 1928; S1280 circa 1931). Built as a floatplane, N9913 was converted to a wheeled undercarriage, flying off the platform on B turret of Ramillies. She visited H.M.S. Furious in March 1926 ending up flying into the sea off Furious in 1928 and salvaged. S1070 flew with H.M.S. Eagle when deleted from Ramillies 1928 and then to H.M.S. Royal Sovereign (B turret, see below) before going back to Eagle. The aircraft has a 14-cylinder Armstrong Siddeley Jaguar two-row radial engine, pilots said that the Flycatcher had superb handling qualities and nearly 200 were built. Caliper devices with tensioned wires hold the upper and lower wings down on the platform. Note the range finder with shutters closed and the mass of voice tubes coming from the base of the bridge. The wooden case in front of the undercarriage is marked "402", maybe it came from 402 Squadron which had six Flycatchers




13.3cm x 8cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 35271

Fairey Flycatcher taking it rough, Bay of Biscay 1931


H.M.S. Royal Sovereign shipped a Flycatcher on B turret from January to May 1931. This photograph shows the poor aircraft taking sea and spray during a crossing of the Bay of Biscay. One can only imagine the detrimental effects of the seawater on the structure and engine of the Flycatcher (mainly wood with fabric but a tubular steel structure for the central and forward fuselage). The B and X platforms were replaced in 1932 with a quarterdeck-mounted catapult and crane for a Fairey IIIF and then a Hawker Osprey. Note the same system as in H.M.S. Ramillies to hold the aircraft down on the platform.

Recto:"H.M.S. Royal Sovereign crossing the Bay"


8cm x 13.2cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 126043

Hanriot HD1 on B turret of U.S.S. Texas, circa 1919


The Hanriot HD1 was a French floatplane of which 26 were purchased by the U.S. Navy for use during WW1 then at the end of the war, several floatplanes were converted to airplanes with an undercarriage and flown off the turret platform of battleships such as the U.S.S. Texas shown here. The metal supports for the platform can be seen over B turret but the decking is not laid out. Note the small caliber gun strapped to the port gun of A turret - for turret training or a saluting gun?




14cm x 8cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 130022

Hansa Brandenburg KDW floatplane


The Brandenburg KDW had the novel "star-strutter" wing bracing and with large floats and despite including a lower fin below the rear fuselage, the aircraft was very difficult to fly with poor directional stability. The aircraft shown here has the Maybach 160 h.p. engine. Note the synchronised Spandau machine gun far forward on the starboard side of the fuselage, out of reach for the pilot to clear any stoppages in flight. The floatplane is on its trolly ready to be launched, see the hand-hold in the lower tail fin. In the background is a Friedrichshafen FF variant, with two sets of struts between the wings, this may be a FF38.




10.6cm x 7.7cm Matt gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 127055

Van Berkel WA, Netherlands floatplane


The Netherlands was neutral during WW1 and a number of aircraft of the belligerents landed, and were subsequently interned, in the country due to battle damage or navigation errors, for example. After assessing several examples of the German Hansa Brandenburg W12 floatplane, the Netherlands government was impressed by its performance and seaworthiness and purchased a licence to build the Brandenburg. A contract was awarded to the Van Berkel Patents company to build 35 floatplanes designated Van Berkel WA. Several floatplanes went out to the Dutch East Indies and destroyers were modified to carry a WA on the stern as were the ironclads Hertog Hendrick and Jacob van Heemskerk of the home fleet. The type was in service until 1934.

Verso: postcard sent from 's Gravenhage (The Hague) to an address in Rotterdam, franked 1933


12.7cm x 6.7cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 128001

Consolidated NY2 floatplane trainer, 1924-1939


This and the following two floatplanes were produced between 1924 and 1934 to provide training for U.S. Navy pilots and crews. The Consolidated NY was derived from the U.S. Army's PT-1 trainer with the U.S. Navy requesting modifications to include a Wright radial engine and a single large float under the fuselage and wingtip stabilizing floats. The aircraft shown lined up here are the NY2 variant with a larger wingspan and the nine-cylinder 220 hp Wright J-5 (R-790) engine.

Verso:"Consolidated NY-2"


10.5cm x 6cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 127035

Stearman NS-1 Navy trainer


This Stearman NS-1 has the Wright J-5 (R-790-8) engine and is one of the 61 that were built for the U.S. Navy in 1935-1936. Later versions carried the Lycoming or the Continental engine. Note the clean lines and a single strut undercarriage.

Verso:"Stearman PT 17" in light pencil


10.8cm x 6 cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 127023

Naval Aircraft Factory N3N-3 trainer, n° 4480


At the end of WW1, the U.S. Navy had a large stock of Wright 220hp J-5 (R-790) radial engines in storage. This stock was used to equip the three floatplane trainers in production at the time including the N3N. 179 N3N-1s were built with Wright J-5 engine but it had become obsolete when the N3N-3 version came into production, 816 were made. The N3N-3 had the Wright 240hp J-6-7 (R(760-96) without the wide anti-drag motor cowling as can be seen here. The last N3N-3s were retired in 1961 and 4480 is now at the Yanks Air Museum, Chino, California, USA.




17.8cm x 10.3 Modern reprint photograph

 

Catalogue number 129046

Arado AR 95


The Luftwaffe used the Ar 95 from undelivered export orders as a trainer aircraft for maritime reconnaissance but it did not interest the German Navy.

Verso:"Arado-Bildstelle Babelsberg (Editor's note: Babelsberg is a district of Potsdam)" and "Released on 14.542 by the censorship office of the Luftwaffe" then "Arado Ar 95" in German and blue rubber stamped


15.8cm x 11.3cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 129045

Arado AR 95

Whilst the German forces were not interested in the Ar 95, export orders to Chile and Turkey were received although the war prevented the delivery to Turkey and the Luftwaffe took over the aircraft. Here we can see the 7.9mm in the rear cockpit, there was a similar fixed forward-firing gun and this floatplane is carrying a 700 kg torpedo. The swastika signs appear to have been drawn on the original negative, same for above.

Verso:"Arado-Bildstelle Babelsberg (Editor's note: Babelsberg is a district of Potsdam)" and "Released on 14.542 by the censorship office of the Luftwaffe" then "Arado Ar 95" in German and blue rubber stamped


15.4cm x 11.2cm Gelatin silver print

 
Catalogue number 129010

Heinkel He 114


The Heinkel He 114 was another German Interwar floatplane without any outstanding qualities although it was operational (Black Sea, Greece and Crete on reconnaissance missions) for the first half of the war. It was built as a reconnaissance floatplane to be used on warships but was mainly used in coastal activities. The lower wing of the biplane was about three quarters of the length of the upper wing, note the Y-shaped struts. This floatplane, D-IHDG, has the original production BMW 132 radial engine.




13cm x 7.7cm Gelatin silver print

 

Large seaplane flying boats: The Sauders-Roe London

Catalogue number 86 F1

Saunders-Roe London, 1936, photo 1


The following photographs were taken at the Columbine assembly hall of the Saunders-Roe Company, Cowes in 1936. They show the first production batch of the London I general purpose coastal patrol flying boat.

Verso: “Singapore? @ Medway" in light pencil

Credit: General Electric Co. Ltd

28.8cm x 22.3cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 86 F1

Saunders-Roe London, 1936, photo 2




Verso: “Singapore? @ Medway" in light pencil

Credit: General Electric Co. Ltd.

28.8cm x 22.3cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 86 F1

Saunders-Roe London, 1936, photo 3




Verso: “Singapore? @ Medway" in light pencil

Credit: General Electric Co. Ltd.

28.8cm x 22.3cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 86 F1, photo 2, detail

Wing structure, K5257


The wings and tail were made of duralumin and stainless steel covered with fabric. Note the space between the engines to accommodate the fuel tanks. Twin fins acted like endplates on an adjustable tailplane improving lift. The rudders were horn-balanced as were the tail elevators. Note the place for trim tabs on each rudder.







 

Catalogue number 86 F1, photo 1, detail

Wing structure, floats and engines


The struts can be seen fixed to the fuselage at the anchor points. The Bristol Pegasus IIIM3 nine-cylinder air-cooled radial engines are in place under the upper wing. We can see three floats, they were made with a small step about two thirds along the float, the trestles tend to obscure the step on the middle and right floats but it can clearly be seen on the left float. Note the second hull step aft of the rectangular hatch.







 

Catalogue number 86 F1, photo 2, detail

Hull


The hull was of a simple corregated panel construction of Alclad and duralumin with stainless steel being used for stressed fittings. Going forward from the stern of each hull we can see the dorsal gun position, the rear strut anchor point between the first two portholes, the forward anchor point is between the last porthole and the square hatch. Note the first hull step at the level of the last porthole going forward. The circular opening to starboard may be for an astrodome. The fully-glazed cockpit gave good all-round visibility, note the steering wheel type control column. Centre left can be seen the tail plane with, in the middle, the opening for the rear gun position and to the far left is an elevator, only the upper wing had elevators.







 

Catalogue number 86 F1, photo 3, detail

Hull


There was a single Lewis IIIB machine gun in each of the three gun positions. Each was mounted on a Scarf ring as we can see here in the bow gun position. This mounting could slide aft on rails to facilitate mooring. Note the mooring rope hanging from the underside of the hull, also the fixed hand line running round the bow. Right at the tip of the bow is the hatch of bomb-aiming, it is shown here slightly open.







 

Catalogue number 86 F1, photo 2, detail

Hull


The rear gun position can be seen as a circular opening in the rear of the hull, it gave a good arc of fire. Bottom left, we can see the rail along which the bow Scarf ring can be slid back.







 

Catalogue number 86 F1, photo 3, detail

Workshops


The first_floor workshop with several structural parts and, far left, the patterns for building up the floats.







 

Catalogue number 86 F1, photo 3, detail

Workshops


The assembly hall included workshops for the various components of the London. Centre foreground are two cone-shaped engine cowlings. Towards the end of the ground-floor workshop are what appear to be fuel tanks with a curved top. Similar structures – centre wing components maybe - can be seen in the first-floor workshop







 
Catalogue number 112122

Saunders-Roe London prototype K3560


The prototype London K3560 differed in several ways to the production batch - nine-sided cowlings, servo-rudders initially and corregated floats without the inward strut, for example. Note the hinged door opening forward and upward in the bow and the bomb under the lower wing.



Credit: Westland Aircraft Limited, Saunders-Roe

20.5 x 15.5cm Gelatin silver print

 

Large seaplane flying boats

Catalogue number 99006

Martin Mars


Martin JRM Mars was a long-range transport (cargo and personnel) flying boat operating in the Pacific Ocean for the Naval Air Transport Service. The Mars came into service in 1945 and flew principally between the West Coast and Hawaii until 1956. In 1949, a Mars flew 301 servicemen from San Diego to San Francisco.



Credit: The Glenn Martin Company

24.2cm x 18.8cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 99008

Martin P5M Marlin, post-1958


The Marlin came into service with the U.S. Navy in the early 50s whilst the general tendency in navies was to use land-based aircraft of improved performance as they came available (the Marlin was eventually replaced with the Lockheed Neptune). The U.S. Navy built up a very mobile fleet of flying boats capable of operating from seaplane tenders. Here the original bow turret of the prototype was replaced a nose radome housing an APS-44A radar. On the tail fin is a magnetic anomaly detector.





24cm x 19.5cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 128008

Martin P5M-2 Marlin


In this photograph, we can see the powerful search light pod under the tip of the starboard wing for use in ASW. Note the attachment for stores under the wings, just outboard of the engines.

Verso: “…. Now in quantity production at the Martin plant in Baltimore, Md., this new anti-submarine seaplane will soon be joining squadrons of the Atlantic and Pacific fleets. Powerful search radar located in its white nose, coupled with associated electronic equipment and a full store of rockets, depth charges, or torpedoes, make this new seaplane a potent threat to even snorkelling enemy submarines. Powerful Wright 3400 hp. Engines give the P5M-2 long range and speed with which to fulfill its mission of submarine detection and kill.”

Credit: Martin, Information Services

24.2cm x 19.5cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 128121

Martin P5M


The French Navy had the use of ten Marlins from the U.S. Navy in the late 59s. Note the search light under the starboard wing, the magnetic anomaly detector on the tail fin and the radome just aft of the cockpit.





16.8cm x 11.6cm Photograph

 

Catalogue number 99006

Martin P5M Marlin, French Aeronavale


In 1964, the French Navy Marlins were returned to the U.S. Navy.



Credit: E.C.P.-Armées

18cm x 12.8cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 28001

Martin PBM-5 Mariner


With its gull wing and four-bladed propellers, this Mariner is being brought aboard a U.S. Navy seaplane tender,probably U.S.S. Pine Island, the aircraft weighed over 25 tons so a hefty crane was needed. We can see the randome of the AN/APS-15 air surface radar just behind the cockpit.





24cm x 19.5cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 37102

Martin PBM-5, detail


The Mariner is on the apron resting on stub wheels and a neat tail wheel, 1951.

Credit: U.S. Naval Air Station, San Diego



24cm x 19.4cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 128007

Martin PBM-5 Mariner


The later Mariner PBM-5A was equipped with a retractable undercarriage giving it a full amphibious capacity. A post-war improvement was the introduction of the improved APS-31 ASR in the teardrop radome.



Credit: The Glenn Martin Company

24.5cm x 18.5cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 125083

Martin P6M SeaMaster, 1955


The Martin P6M SeaMaster was the result of a post-war battle for funding and maintaining a strategic role between the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Navy. Aircraft were expected to deliver nuclear weapons in the event of another war and the U.S. Navy sent out tenders for a heavy, 14 tonne bomb load, seaplane nuclear bomber with a reconnaissance and minelaying capacity. The four turbojet engines sat in pairs over the wings but testing revealed scorching of the rear fuselage/engine pods as can be seen in this 1955 photograph taken at the Martin Aircraft Works, Baltimore. This is the prototype XP6M-1, it crashed in December 1955. Note the wing tip floats/fuel pods.

Verso: “Martin XP6M-1 Seamaster 3.2.55

Credit: Martin Aircraft Information Services, Baltimore 3, Maryland

23.6cm x 17.7cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 125084

Martin P6M SeaMaster, 1955


The potential of the SeaMaster was great, it had the vast expanses of the oceans as a runway compared to conventional land-based nuclear bomber. However, budget cuts and an excessive development period meant the Navy’s role in nuclear strategy was taken over by the Polaris ballistic missile launched from submarines. We can see how close the inboard jet nozzles are to the fuselage. The wings has a distinct anhedral form with stable floatation obtained from the wing tip fuel pods. Note the rear twin machine gun turret.

Verso: “Martin XP6M-1 Seamaster 3.2.55

Credit: Martin Aircraft Information Services, Baltimore 3, Maryland

23.8cm x 17.5cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 128005

Martin P6M SeaMaster, 1955


An important part of the SeaMaster programme was to produce a suitable system for moving the seaplane out of/into the sea. Here we can see the independent motorized buggies latched onto the hull. Note the inverted lip around nose to help keep spray off the cockpit.



Credit: Martin Aircraft, Baltimore 3, Maryland

23.9cm x 19.4cm Gelatin silver print

 
Catalogue number 129007

Martin P6M SeaMaster, January 1955


This photograph was taken prior to the first flight of XP6M-1 in July 1955. The aircraft is out on the apron and we can see the huge jet engine pods over the wings, the anhedral wing shape and the wing tip floats/ fuel pods. Their almost horizontal alignment plus wing flexing during take-off and landing meant that they had a strong tendency to bit into the sea with the consequent effect on aircraft stability.

Verso: "5 January 1955"

Credit: Martin Aircraft, Baltimore 3, Maryland

23.9cm x 19.4cm Gelatin silver print

 
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Catalogue number 128013

Bringing a Caudron J floatplane on board the Foudre, 1914


The Foudre was a torpedo boat/submarine carrier that was modified to become a floatplane carrier. A derrick is being used to bring a Caudron J onto the deck. Note the man standing on the motor, the wheels in the floats as well as the gantry for moving the torpedo boats/submarines and the keen photographer.

Verso: “The floatplane Caudron” in French and in black ink

Credit: S.A.F.A.R.A.

9cm x 13.9cm Gelatin silver print

 

Ships converted to early aircraft carriers

Catalogue number 20038

The first Ark Royal aircraft carrier


In 1914, a collier was converted to a seaplane carrier and named H.M.S. Ark Royal. The ship was later renamed H.M.S. Pegasus to free up the name Ark Royal for a new carrier. This carrier lacked the speed for any fleet action, the solution, as we will see below, was to convert the very much fast cross-channel and small passenger ships

Verso: “H.M.S. “Ark. Royal.” Aircraft carrier also in the lower regions carries oil fuel to supply the ships at sea.” in black ink

Credit: Abrahams

12.3cm x 6.7cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 117063

Handling a floatplane on H.M.S. Ark Royal


The limited space on H.M.S. Ark Royal made it difficult to manoeuver a floatplane between the hold and the hanger as well as lifting it in and out of the sea. The Short Admiralty type 166 shown here had folding wings to assist storage in the hangar/hold

Verso: “English aircraft hoisted on board a ship Bay of Salonica 1916” in French and in black ink



20.2cm x 15.1 cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 66028

Launching a floatplane


A Short 166 being lowered from H.M.S. Ark Royal into the sea, 1915. Note the men on deck holding lines to steady the tail and floats.



Credit: Imperial War Museum (IWM Non-Commercial Licence)

20.4cm x 15.3cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 108038

Develpments in launching and recovering aircraft


In 1940, H.M.S. Pegasus (ex-Ark Royal) was converted for trials with a fighter catapult. The catapult was fixed to the raised structure on deck forward of the cranes. We can also see the Hein mat platform that was used in trials to recover a floatplane whilst underway (see catalogue n° 118125 below).

Recto: “H.M.S. Pegasus”



13.4cm x 8.5cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 118125

The Hein mat


This photograph gives a good view of a Hein mat being deployed over the stern of the French cruiser Foch in the mid-1930s. The floatplane would come up from the stern and ride over and onto the floating mat, all whilst the ship was underway. The floatplane would then be hoisted on board by a crane.





14.4cm x 9.5cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 79027

The cross-channel ferry Engadine converted to an aircraft carrier


We can see a floatplane at the entrance to the hangar right aft. The ship is camouflaged.



Credit: Abrahams

13.2 cm x 7.5cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 35275

The second H.M.S. Pegasus


H.M.S. Pegasus was a fast passenger ship converted in 1917 to an aircraft carrier with a large hangar and cranes working over the stern. This H.M.S. Pegasus was sold in 1931 so enabling the name to be transferred to the ex-Ark Royal in 1934.

Recto: “Pegasus” in gold paint

Credit: Real Photographs Co.

14cm x 9 cm Gelatin silver print

 
Catalogue number 24008

An early flight deck fitted to H.M.S. Pegasus


A forward flight deck was built up to launch wheeled aircraft brought up to the flight deck by lift from the forward hangar. In this photograph, the ship has acquired dazzle camouflage.

Recto: “British Aeroplane ship Part of the Grand Fleet

Credit: Denson

12.9cm x 8cm Gelatin silver print

 

Japanese aircraft flown by the French Aeronavale

Catalogue number 65058

Japanese bomber examined by the ATAIU


The Asia Technical Air Intelligence Unit (ATAIU) was part of an intelligence network setup to recover and evaluate Japanese aircraft. Technical merits were examined and test flights were made to reveal weak points in the aircraft's performance that could be used by the Allies. Here a crashed Japanese bomber from the Pearl Harbour attack in under study.





16.2cm x 17.3cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 105028

French-flown Nakajima A6M2-N Rufe, 1946


The Rufe was based on the Zero fighter but the addition of floats greatly diminished its performance. This aircraft was recovered in Surabaya and flown by the R.A.F. to Singapore and then on to a base in Malaya for evaluation by the ATAIU. It was then handed over to the French Aeronavale who operated this aircraft in what was then Indochina but it crashed during a mission in 1946. Cat Lai, now in Vietnam, had a base of the French Aeronavale from 1931 to 1953.

Verso: “Nakajima.A6M2.N- Code "Rufe" 1946. Esc. 8S. Cat. Laï” in black ink

Credit: Photo Gamec. Collection Thomé

17cm x 12cm Gelatin silver print

 

Catalogue number 105029

French-flown Nakajima A6M2-N Rufe, 1946


The French airforce base of Bien Hoa was particularly active from 1946 during the Indochina war and this photograph shows the French Rufe being launched. This was the aircraft in which Enseigne de vaisseau Raymond Hostalier was killed during a trial flight at low altitude, the aircraft going into the river near Ba-sang. Note the insignia "ATAIU on the tail.

Verso: "Bien Hoa beginning 1946. Nakajima A6M2-N Code "Rufe" (Zero floatplane version)" in pencil and in French



17.2cm x 12cm Gelatin silver print

 
Catalogue number 105030

French-flown Nakajima A6M2-N Rufe, 1946


The 8S squadron of the French aeronavale flew the Japanese aircraft Nakajima A6M2-N Rufe and the Aïchi Jake. This photograph shows a French aeronavale Aichi E13A long-range reconnaissance floatplane flying over the Donai meanders. France operated several Aichi Jake's during the Indochina war.

Verso: "Aïchi-Kokuki Esc 8S Cat Lai 1946 Flying over Donai" in black ink

Credit: Photo Gamec Collection Thomé

17.2cm x 12cm Gelatin silver print